Amberley outskirts – set in 2.67 acres

The Cricketers New Barn Road, West Sussex

£800,000

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Marketed by:Fowlers



Greenfield House 3 The Square
Storrington
West Sussex
RH20 4DJ

01903 745844

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Property Location

Key Features

  • Former Beer House dating back to 1850's
  • Extending to 2361 sqft, Views over open countryside
  • Four Bedrooms, Occupying 2.67 acres
  • Sitting Room with Open Fireplace
  • Additional Reception Room
  • Conservatory, Kitchen/Dining Room
  • Ground Floor Cloakroom, Utility Room and Store Room
  • Cellar with Three Rooms, Family Bathroom
  • Formal Gardens adjoining Field
  • Car Port, Extensive Parking

Property Description

DESCRIPTION Originally dating back to the 1850's, The Cricketers once served as a Beer house for the Amberley Chalk Pit workers, establishing itself formally as a Public House in the 1930's and converted into a residential home around 1967, occupying 2.67 acres which previously incorporated the Cricket pitch. Accommodation comprises: sitting room with OPEN FIREPLACE and adjoining reception room, CONSERVATORY, kitchen/dining room, FOUR FIRST FLOOR bedrooms, family bathroom and three lower ground floor cellar rooms. Outside, there is extensive parking to the front with formal gardens and car port giving access to a field screened by mature trees and shrubs with DELIGHTFUL OUTLOOK over large shallow dew pond, willows and OPEN COUNTRYSIDE.

ENCLOSED GABLED ENTRANCE PORCH Part glazed door to:

ENTRANCE HALL Radiator.

GROUND FLOOR CLOAKROOM Low level flush w.c., wall-mounted wash hand basin, extractor fan.

SITTING ROOM 12' 5" x 11' 9" (3.78m x 3.58m) Original sash window, feature cast iron wood burning stove with oak mantel over and tiled hearth, built-in shelving, exposed wood flooring, TV point, archway through to:

SECOND RECEPTION ROOM 16' 4" x 11' 6" (4.98m x 3.51m) Radiator, exposed wood flooring, part glazed double doors leading to:

CONSERVATORY 11' 5" x 11' 5" (3.48m x 3.48m) Tiled flooring, outlook over gardens, open fields and the South Downs beyond.

KITCHEN/DINING ROOM 24' 7" x 11' 5 maximum" (7.49m x 3.48m)

KITCHEN AREA Range of oak style wall and base units with integrated fan assisted electric 'Zanussi' oven and separate grill, space and plumbing for washing machine, stainless steel double sink unit with range of roll topped working surfaces with inset four ring electric hob and 'Bosch' extractor over.

DINING AREA Radiator, original sash windows.

ENCLOSED STORE AREA 21' 11" x 7' 11" (6.68m x 2.41m) Accessed via steps from kitchen, high level flush w.c., door accessing outside and door accessing:

UTILITY ROOM 10' 11" x 9' 9" (3.33m x 2.97m) Further steps down to:

CELLAR 17' 3" x 12' 2 maximum" (5.26m x 3.71m) First area has a radiator, storage cupboard, doors accessing additional area with further storage cupboard.
Other cellar rooms measure: 12'3 x 10'2, 11'2 x 8'3 and 8'10 x 6'11

STAIRS TO:

FIRST FLOOR LANDING Access to loft space.

BEDROOM ONE 14' 6" x 12' 11" (4.42m x 3.94m) Original sash window, radiator, built-in wardrobe cupboards.

BEDROOM TWO 13' 4" x 12' 7 maximum" (4.06m x 3.84m) Radiator, dual aspect sash windows, recessed storage area.

BEDROOM THREE 11' 0" x 10' 5" (3.35m x 3.18m) Radiator, sash windows.

BEDROOM FOUR 11' 2" x 8' 9" (3.4m x 2.67m) Radiator, sash windows.

FAMILY BATHROOM Inset bath, pedestal wash hand basin, low level flush w.c., part tiled walls, extractor fan, tiled flooring, radiator.

OUTSIDE

PARKING Tarmac driveway accessed via New Barn Road leading to five bar wooden gate with further tarmac driveway with parking for several vehicles.

CAR PORT

FRONT GARDEN Mainly laid to lawn, timber storage shed, screened by mature trees and shrubs, patio area, covered storage area, gateway leading to:

ADJACENT VIEW POINT Field measuring 2.67 acres, mainly lawned areas, screened by mature trees and shrubs, enclosed vegetable garden.

HISTORY OF THE CRICKETERS The Cricketers has a long and colourful history behind it. It was first built in the 1850s to serve as a beer house for the labourers working in the newly established Amberley chalk pits. Digging, mining and then putting the chalk through the kilns to create quicklime was thirsty work and the ability to drink beer alone - a beer house could not sell intoxicating spirits - made it acceptable to the Pepper family who owned the chalk pits from the 1870s onwards.

The field attached to the house was used as a cricket pitch in the summer but later found greater popularity as a football pitch. Some time, probably in the 1930s, it became a pub.

Some of the later landlords were local legends. In the Second World War one landlord had a son in the RAF at Tangmere and there are tales of how his son and friends roared down on their motorbikes for a lock-in and a sing-song. The piano where it stood is now a TV in the sitting room.

A later landlord who served in Malta during the war owned the pub in the 1950s and 1960s (a couple of people in the village still remember him). Eccentric to a fault he was known for his propensity to bar anyone entering the pub whose face he didn't like. He also had an elaborate system for evading the police who were aware of his lock-in drinks with the locals but were never able to catch him. Once the police were known to be on their way, he and his friends would all crouch behind the bar (roughly where the sink in the kitchen is) as the police would shine their torches in on a dimly lit but empty saloon bar at midnight.

The closure of the chalk pits in the 1960s - at one time the Pepper family employed about 70 men - meant the pub could only rely on passing trade for business. It was converted into a house around 1967 and the wall outside which used to advertise the beers sold was covered over and a sunroom added.

One more recent tale is that some 40 years ago on Christmas Eve a friend of the owners was staying and they nipped out across the field for a drink in the Bridge. En-route one lady lost a very valuable platinum ring which despite everyone's best efforts was never found again. The present owners have had the field swept with metal detectors and an Elizabethan groat (worth 4d) was discovered but not the platinum ring!

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