Progress and work ahead at section of the A285 Duncton

Ongoing investigation work at the section of the A285 Duncton

A short section of the A285 Duncton, just south of the Seaford College entrance, has been closed following a slippage of earth over a culvert that spans beneath the carriageway.

The movement, possibly caused by exceptional rainfall, led to the carriageway subsiding and this section of road is closed for safety reasons. Signed diversions are in place while investigations continue and businesses have been able to remain open.

Joy Dennis, Cabinet Member for Highways and Transport, said: “We understand the impact that this closure is having for residents, businesses and other road users, and continue to work with our contractors and specialist teams to find a lasting solution so the section of road can be reopened as soon as possible. However, this is not a straightforward road repair situation: issues include road subsidence and the challenge of a damaged carriageway which has culverts spanning beneath it, carrying water from the adjacent, large pond.”

Several specialist teams have been on site: a diver has assessed the underwater conditions and trial pit and CCTV investigations are being carried out and vegetation cleared. Future works are likely to include:

  • Improving/diverting the existing drainage system to try to minimise future erosion
  • Strengthening of the embankment
  • Obtaining all necessary consent / approvals from landowners and statutory bodies
  • Undertaking repairs to the culverts
  • Protecting utilities, including a fresh water mains supply
  • Reconstruction of the carriageway
  • Installation of safety barriers on both sides of the carriageway

The County Council currently estimates the works could take up to three months to complete, subject to any adverse weather or unexpected issues, which can affect any construction project.

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